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Andy Warhol: The Last Decade

12 Mar

Andy Warhol: The Last Decade


Andy Warhol: The Last Decade is the first United States museum exhibition of the late works of American artist Andy Warhol (1928-1987) and the first major Warhol survey in New York since the 1989 exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art. Created amid the frenetic activity of Warhol’s celebrity, the nearly fifty paintings on view reveal the artist’s vitality, energy, and spirit of experimentation. During this time Warhol produced more works, in a considerable number of series and on a vastly larger scale, than at any other point in his forty-year career. It was a decade of great artistic development for him, characterized by a dramatic transformation of his style and the introduction of new techniques.

Warhol’s active social life, continuing business ventures, print projects, television productions, fashion engagements, and renewed interest in painting combined to make the artist’s final decade one of the busiest in his career. Beginning with the Oxidation series of 1977-78 and the screened Shadows initiated in 1978, he began exploring abstract art, a conceptual and stylistic break from his Pop imagery of the 1960s. Over the next ten years, his prolific output of paintings included a return to the figurative inspired by his collaborations with Jean-Michel Basquiat, Francesco Clemente, and Keith Haring; black-and-white paintings based on magazine advertisements; psychologically revealing fright-wig self-portraits; the Camouflage works; and explorations of religious themes, including the Last Supper paintings, which infused Leonardo da Vinci’s iconic Italian fresco with a pop sensibility and constituted the largest series that Warhol produced throughout his career.

Together, these works demonstrate how Warhol simultaneously incorporated the screened image and pursued a reinvention of painting. Created alongside his commissioned portraits and print series, many of these late paintings were personal projects that were not exhibited until after the artist’s death on February 22, 1987.

The works in the exhibition are on loan from private and public collections. Included are examples of the Oxidation series, in which urine is a component; the mysteriously evocative Shadows, some with diamond dust; a late example of Warhol’s iconic Campbell Soup (Tomato) from his Retrospectives and Reversals series; the Yarn paintings, a direct reference to Jackson Pollock’s drip paintings; monumental Rorschach paintings;and a version of The Last Supper, featuring images of Christ juxtaposed with a price tag and Mineola motorcycles, that is included in the Fort Worth and Brooklyn presentations only.

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The New Typography

16 Feb

In the 1920s and 1930s, the so-called New Typography movement brought graphics and information design to the forefront of the artistic avant-garde in Central Europe. Rejecting traditional arrangement of type in symmetrical columns, modernist designers organized the printed page or poster as a blank field in which blocks of type and illustration (frequently photomontage) could be arranged in harmonious, strikingly asymmetrical compositions. Taking his lead from currents in Soviet Russia and at the Weimar Bauhaus, the designer Jan Tschichold codified the movement with accessible guidelines in his landmark book Die Neue Typographie (1928). Almost overnight, typographers and printers adapted this way of working for a huge range of printed matter, from business cards and brochures to magazines, books, and advertisements. This installation of posters and numerous small-scale works is drawn from MoMA’s rich collection of Soviet Russian, German, Dutch, and Czechoslovakian graphics. They represent material from Tschichold’s own collection, which supported his teaching and publication from around 1927 to 1937.

Alan Aldridge: The Man with Kaleidoscope Eyes

2 Jun

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Alan Aldridge embodied the spirit of the 60s and 70s. His evocative, psychedelic images epitomised the feeling and art of an era.
As The Beatles lead an unstoppable assault on the global charts, it was Aldridge’s designs and visual identity that defined The Beatles image and music in a changing world. Still busy creating today, he was responsible for the look of the House of Blues in Los Angeles, Aldridge is an artist, an illustrator, a graphic designer, art director and film maker.
He masterminded the seminal art book The Beatles Illustrated Lyrics and designed Andy Warhol’s iconic Chelsea Girls film poster.
As Art Director at Penguin, Aldridge produced ground- breaking covers. Commissions for The Rolling Stones, Elton John and illustrations for the award-winning children’s book The Butterfly Ball and The Grasshoppers Feast will be included in the exhibition, the first complete retrospective of Aldridge’s work in the UK.
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About exhibition;
This exhibition will cover Aldridge’s career to date, from the early 60s when his whirling designs refreshed the somber tone of Penguin book covers, to his collaborations with The Beatles and their Apple record company, through to serving as creative director to the original Hard Rock Cafe.
Commissions from Andy Warhol, The Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd, Elton John and The House of Blues will also be on display alongside photographs, sketch books and illustrations from his seminal children’s books.

Mariscal: Drawing Life

2 Jun
The Design Museum presents the first UK retrospective of Spanish designer and artist Javier Mariscal. Regarded as one
the world’s most innovative and original designers of our time, Mariscal’s rich and diverse body of work spans kooky cartoon characters to stunning interiors, from furniture to graphic design and corporate identities.
The exhibition and graphics will be designed by Mariscal, promising an immersive experience for the visitor into the world and mind of Mariscal.
The exhibition space will be a fully illustrated environment, rich with orchestrated scenarios and installations, each telling the story of Mariscal’s pivotal projects, designs and the drawings that shaped them.
Sketches, designs, films and photographs will be on display alongside furniture and textiles.
Mariscal will also design and paint an elaborate mural for the exterior of the Design Museum showcasing his unique vision and signature design style.
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Mariscal’s intense relationship with drawing and illustration;
is central to his career and has become the basis for his designs over the last 30 years. He gave Barcelona its graphic identity as it emerged from the Franco era, illustrating a sunny and optimistic city full of possibilities. In 1992 he introduced the world to Cobi, the official Olympic mascot of the Barcelona games. Mariscal has designed furniture for leading manufacturers such as Moroso and Magis, created interiors for bars and hotels as well as a retail and graphic identity for Camper and the interior of the recently opened H&M flagship store in Barcelona.
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